Archives for the month of: March, 2012

Note: This post has been rewritten to make it more accurate. Go to You, Protein, and Amino Acids on The Food Refashionista blog.

Bean protein is considered an “incomplete” protein.  I don’t know about you, but I’ve never really understood the term: incomplete protein. I know we have to “complete” the protein with other food, but what does that mean, and how are we supposed to do it?

Clearly, it was time to do some research, and here is what I learned.

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Want to feel decadent?

Have some of this bake for breakfast. I just did—two delicious pieces. It tastes like cake—sweet. It feels like cake—slightly dry and slightly crumbly. It even looks like cake.

But, as we know, it isn’t. Bean bakes are primarily protein and vegetable. You can’t get anything better for breakfast than that.

After I mixed it and added spices to bring out the sweetness of the squash, I realized it needed something to give it that extra je ne sais quoi. Coconut, I decided, but then I’m a coconut nut. I have the feeling raisins or currents would also work.

Anyway, this bean bake is so good that I’ve submitted it, along with “Cauliflower-Salsa Bean Bake and Dip” for the “My Legume Love Affair” event, hosted by The Well-Seasoned Cook and girlichef. Wish me luck!

Enjoy!

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Yum. Yum. Yum. If you like mango that is. My favourite mangos, the yellow ataulfos (see note below), have made their springtime appearance in the stores and, of course, I had to try a bean bake with them.

My first effort included two mangos and one ripe banana. Nope, not quite right. Between the beans and the banana, the mango flavour was overwhelmed. It was still tasty (we ate it all) but not quite the flavour that I had lurking in my taste buds.

The second try—just with mangos—hit the jackpot. Deliciously sweet and as tangy as I had hoped with with a texture somewhere between cake and pumpkin pie. Perfect. (Sigh.)

Interestingly, after it came out of the oven, the bake appeared to be….well, almost airy. When I put in a knife to see if it was done, it felt like there was nothing beneath the surface. The spouse, who was watching, informed me that, although it was brown around the edges, it had clearly not finished cooking. However, in all things bean-bake, I follow my instincts. The knife had come out clean; thus it was done.

I let the bake cool and then put it in the refrigerator overnight. Next morning, it was just as substantial as all the other bakes I’ve made. (Sigh again.)

Update: I just made this bake again but with two surprisingly tart mangos. I decided to drop the lemon and add ¼ cup additional sweetener. Still tart but the additional sugar took the edge off. Very tasty. Oh, and just as airy when I took it out of the oven.

Note: “Sometimes referred to as Champagne®, Honey Mangos or Manila Mangos, ataulfo mangos are low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. Generally smaller than other mango varieties, they are a good source of Vitamins A and C, dietary fiber and Vitamin B6. Look for ripe Ataulfos to be bright yellow to orange, giving slightly to gentle pressure. Do not refrigerate. Harvested in Southern Mexico and Ecuador, Ataulfo Mangos are available twice a year, in the spring and fall.” (Adapted from “Ataulfo Mango” at John Vena Inc.)

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Yes, you read the title correctly. 

I intended to make a savoury bean bake because I had leftover, cooked cauliflower that had to be used up.

But my chocolate craving just happened to be in the stratosphere.

What to do?

Use both chocolate and cauliflower in the bean bake, of course. The result? Amazingly delicious and brownie-like without a hint of healthy vegetable lurking in the depths!

Try it on your family and see if they can guess the secret ingredient? The spouse couldn’t and just rolled his eyes when I told him.

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